Unlocking Read-Write Culture

in the last two days in NYC I had amazing conversations on how our world is transforming with three of my former students. They come at the issue from different perspectives, Sofia is in the BCG Strategy institute thinking about the future of strategy, Adriana is working for a big Fortune 500 company trying to introduce sustainability into core business strategy, and Sam is in private equity in Hongkong.

The debates we had in Starbucks (in itself a high-res global MUD – you can even smell the coffee) and on the rooftop terrace of Bookmarks (on 41st and Madison) felt like we were continuing a conversation from last night, because (a) globally our experiences/perspectives are converging and (b) as friends they follow this blog.

Now, imagine we move this type of collective thinking online:  We would be able to unlock the potential of Shaping-Network-Society.  So (a) comment, (b) if you have an idea, write a guest-blog, and (c) as a simple way to jump-start the conversation: What are your favorite three blogs?

About Philipp

Philipp Müller works in the IT industry and is academic dean of the SMBS. Author of "Machiavelli.net". Proud father of three amazing children. The views expressed in this blog are his own.

16. May 2009 by Philipp
Categories: Blog | 6 comments

Comments (6)

  1. sebastian.haselbeck@gmx.com'

    Three excellent blogs to follow are for example Mark Thoma’s Ecomomist’s view ( http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/ ), the blog following Google’s way to world domination at Google Operating System ( http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/ ) and thirdly following such excellent blogs as Bagdad Bureau and DOT EARTH at http://www.nytimes.com/ref/topnews/blog-index.html

  2. sebastian.haselbeck@gmx.com'

    Three excellent blogs to follow are for example Mark Thoma’s Ecomomist’s view ( http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/ ), the blog following Google’s way to world domination at Google Operating System ( http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/ ) and thirdly following such excellent blogs as Bagdad Bureau and DOT EARTH at http://www.nytimes.com/ref/topnews/blog-index.html

  3. violetta.pleshakova@gmail.com'

    The blogosphere is the realm of abundance: too many things to follow, not enough time to do this. I wonder if this abundance is forcing us to transfer the habit of reading into the habit of skimming…
    I follow (not surprisingly) blogs of Larry Lessig, Chris Anderson etc. However, the majority of blogs I read daily are in Russian, on livejournal.com. I have started blogging there more than 4 years ago. The Russian blogosphere has changed a lot. Now there are dozens of the so-called “tisjachneki” – bloggers with more than a thousand readers, however, none of them seems really worth reading to me. Observing all these developments, I am thinking that it makes more sense to start blogging in English and on an international/or my own platform. But: finishing my thesis comes first!

  4. violetta.pleshakova@gmail.com'

    The blogosphere is the realm of abundance: too many things to follow, not enough time to do this. I wonder if this abundance is forcing us to transfer the habit of reading into the habit of skimming…
    I follow (not surprisingly) blogs of Larry Lessig, Chris Anderson etc. However, the majority of blogs I read daily are in Russian, on livejournal.com. I have started blogging there more than 4 years ago. The Russian blogosphere has changed a lot. Now there are dozens of the so-called “tisjachneki” – bloggers with more than a thousand readers, however, none of them seems really worth reading to me. Observing all these developments, I am thinking that it makes more sense to start blogging in English and on an international/or my own platform. But: finishing my thesis comes first!

  5. timochristian.heger@mac.com'

    Spot on! I prefer to read over writing actual comments even though I love to tell everyone how social media has enabled everyone to communicate everyone. Now, as communication is a two-way process …

    I’ll start with my three favorite blogs (and this is actually pretty hard).
    Me being a security policy guy, most of it focusses on this topic. So sorry for the list being a little bit one-sided.

    No particular oder:
    Wired’s DangerRoomA must (in my world).
    Ubiwar. Similar focus as mine (when I’ve finally finished my research proposal) and therefore very valuable to me.
    CT Lab. Smart. Useful. Great online symposia. What else need I say?

    There’re many more, AbuMuqawama, The Small Wars Blog, Registan …

    However, Violetta’s right. So much information – probably too much! To be honest, I’ve resorted more or less to skimming my NYT/Washington Post/NZZ RSS feeds already.
    In fact, I was planning to blog again but I just don’t have the time.

  6. TimoChristian.Heger@mac.com'

    Spot on! I prefer to read over writing actual comments even though I love to tell everyone how social media has enabled everyone to communicate everyone. Now, as communication is a two-way process …

    I’ll start with my three favorite blogs (and this is actually pretty hard).
    Me being a security policy guy, most of it focusses on this topic. So sorry for the list being a little bit one-sided.

    No particular oder:
    Wired’s DangerRoomA must (in my world).
    Ubiwar. Similar focus as mine (when I’ve finally finished my research proposal) and therefore very valuable to me.
    CT Lab. Smart. Useful. Great online symposia. What else need I say?

    There’re many more, AbuMuqawama, The Small Wars Blog, Registan …

    However, Violetta’s right. So much information – probably too much! To be honest, I’ve resorted more or less to skimming my NYT/Washington Post/NZZ RSS feeds already.
    In fact, I was planning to blog again but I just don’t have the time.