Learning from My Students: “…Blogging is so 2005” – Shaping Network Society

Learning from My Students: “…Blogging is so 2005”

In this time and age, where information is shared through new social media and the frameworks to describe collective action change by the minute, it is smart to listen to the first generation of digital natives. On my trip to the East Coast last month, I was impressed by my former students Adriana, Sam, and Sofia in NYC, by Emilene and Katie in Washington DC, who work as strategy re-inventors, sustainability lobbyists, transparency gurus, web 2.0 facilitators, and business re-engineers.

I am constantly learning from the ESPP-class of 2009, who are working on their MPP thesis projects. Topics range from an evaluation of national digital strategies, a focus on sustainability as a core business strategy, to the role of social media in society or  political campaigns. And then there are my 2010 students in peer producing public policy and my undergraduates in network politics: they constantly surprise me and come up with fresh new sources for information and approaches to think about the emerging paradigms. Jenny Miksch came up with a follow-up list to Ines Mergel’s list of who to follow on twitter, so here it is, and join in the debate!

Lessig– is famous for his focus on law and technology
Marshallk – is a VP at ReadWriteWeb
ginatrapani — founder of livehacker.com

Who else are you following that we should know about, so we can move beyond our daily-mes?

About Philipp

Philipp Müller works in the IT industry and is academic dean of the SMBS. Author of "Machiavelli.net". Proud father of three amazing children. The views expressed in this blog are his own.

12. June 2009 by Philipp
Categories: Blog | Tags: , , | 6 comments

Comments (6)

  1. sebastian.haselbeck@gmx.com'

    I don’t think blogging is “so 2005”, what’s 2005 rather, is that everybody and their dog has a blog that doesn’t matter. I personally value – in print or digitally – well written, thoughtful text in whatever form, and a blog allows you to – or forces you to (whichever way you want to look at it) – think about topics and come up with decent language to talk about it. In a way, it’s the anti-twitter. In a blog, you’ll take your time, you may even draft your posts, you’ll spell-check, proof-read, etc. The blog post will persist for days, weeks, months, yet the Tweet will disappear into forgottenness within minutes…

  2. sebastian.haselbeck@gmx.com'

    I don’t think blogging is “so 2005”, what’s 2005 rather, is that everybody and their dog has a blog that doesn’t matter. I personally value – in print or digitally – well written, thoughtful text in whatever form, and a blog allows you to – or forces you to (whichever way you want to look at it) – think about topics and come up with decent language to talk about it. In a way, it’s the anti-twitter. In a blog, you’ll take your time, you may even draft your posts, you’ll spell-check, proof-read, etc. The blog post will persist for days, weeks, months, yet the Tweet will disappear into forgottenness within minutes…

  3. schellong@gmail.com'

    Twitter is just some people’s personal newsnetwork channel (think reuters, dpa, bloomberg)…in essence there is no change. Twitter links of lessig just point to their entries or (and yes this is somewhat new) to something they find interesting

  4. schellong@gmail.com'

    Twitter is just some people’s personal newsnetwork channel (think reuters, dpa, bloomberg)…in essence there is no change. Twitter links of lessig just point to their entries or (and yes this is somewhat new) to something they find interesting

  5. sebastian.haselbeck@gmx.com'

    I agree, for the most part Twitter is just another vehicle for people to get their content publicized. And yeah, I do just the same mostly :)

  6. sebastian.haselbeck@gmx.com'

    I agree, for the most part Twitter is just another vehicle for people to get their content publicized. And yeah, I do just the same mostly :)